Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king’s horses and all the king’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

Having a small child and reading the same rhymes and short stories a hundred times a day, you begin to pronounce the text mechanically while extraneous processes occur in your head: for example, a poem about Humpty Dumpty translated by Marshak. All things considered, this is only an exceptionally acclaimed character in English traditional sonnets, and something should mean this is his incredible fall.

In present day English, “humpty dumpty” has two implications: “fat little man” and “thing that has fallen or broken and can’t be reestablished.”

Dumpty got popular in the wake of turning into the saint of Lewis Carroll’s book “Alice through the Looking Glass”, where he appears as though a major humanoid egg with a tie. He sits in Turkish on a high divider and goes about as a mirror sage, who assists Alice with grasping the significance of the words from the sonnet about Jabberwocky. After the fall of Humpty Dumpty, the White King sends “all the King’s ponies and all the King’s men” to gather him.

There is a variant that the Humpty Dumpty rhyme was committed to King Richard III, who truly tumbled from the divider during the clash of 1485. In verifiable terms, Humpty Dumpty is accepted to have been an extraordinary serfdom.

Latest videos